Professor Chris Whitty

Professor Chris Whitty

Professor Chris Whitty

Chief Medical Officer

    Chief Medical Officer, Department of Health and Social Care, London, UK

     

    Professor Chris Whitty is Chief Medical Officer (CMO) for England, the UK government’s Chief Medical Adviser and head of the public health profession.

    Chris is also Chief Scientific Adviser for the Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC), with overall responsibility for the department’s research and development, including the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR), the government’s major funder of clinical, public health, social care and translational research. He represents the UK on the Executive Board of the World Health Organization.

    Chris is a practising NHS Consultant Physician at University College London Hospitals (UCLH) and the Hospital for Tropical Diseases, and Gresham Professor of Physic at Gresham College.

    Chris is an epidemiologist and has undertaken research and worked as a doctor in the UK, Africa and Asia. He was Professor of Public and International Health at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (LSHTM) before becoming CMO.

    Chris was the interim Government Chief Scientific Adviser from 2017 to 2018, including during the Novichok poisonings. Before that, he was the Chief Scientific Adviser at the Department for International Development (DFID), which included leading technical work on the West Africa Ebola outbreak and other international emergencies.

    Transitions matter: The theory, research and practice of transitions in medical education

    Transitions matter. They provide opportunities for intense learning but are also challenging. Drawing on the literature and her team-based research on medical education transitions, Charlotte will talk about: (i) What transitions are; (ii) How transitions can be researched; and (iii) How medical students and trainees can be helped to navigate transitions.

    Professor Charlotte Rees
    Dean Research
    College of Science, Health, Engineering and Education
    Murdoch University, Western Australia

    Building high performance healthcare teams – culture, relationships and translational simulation

    Improving teamwork and shaping culture in healthcare is easy to say, but hard to do.
    Team training, catchy communication acronyms, and off-site team building might not realise the promise of high performing teams in the complex environment of 21st century healthcare.
    Maybe simulation offers more than we think – if used with agility – to explore work environments and the people in them, to test better systems or practices, and to embed ‘best practice’ once we know what that is.
    And maybe simulation can actually shape culture, and help high performing healthcare teams get better, together.

    Professor Victoria Brazil
    Professor of Emergency Medicine and Director of Simulation
    Gold Coast Health Service, Queensland, Australia