B10

B10

  • 11 May 2021

B10: Consensus statement on the content of clinical reasoning curricula in medical education – what does it mean in practice?

Session objectives:

  • Appreciate the scale and nature of diagnostic error, and international calls to improve ‘diagnosis education’.
  • Know the ‘five domains of clinical reasoning education’ that undergraduate and postgraduate teaching should cover.
  • Know six evidence-based teaching strategies for teaching clinical reasoning, and how these can be applied in practice.

Session summary:
Effective clinical reasoning is required for safe patient care. Students and postgraduate trainees largely learn the knowledge, skills and behaviours required for effective clinical reasoning implicitly, through experience and apprenticeship. There is a growing consensus that schools should teach clinical reasoning in a way that is explicitly integrated into courses throughout each year, adopting a systematic approach consistent with current evidence. However, the clinical reasoning literature is ‘fragmented’ and can be difficult for medical educators to access. The purpose of this symposium is to provide evidence-based practical recommendations for curriculum leads and educators.

https://doi.org/10.1080/0142159X.2020.1842343

Session hosted by:
UK Clinical Reasoning in Medical Education Group (CReME) 

Session theme:
Teaching and facilitating learning

Target audience group:
Policy Makers
Curriculum leads and educators

Target care sector:
Undergraduate education

B10: Consensus statement on the content of clinical reasoning curricula in medical education – what does it mean in practice?

Session objectives:

Session summary:
Effective clinical reasoning is required for safe patient care. Students and postgraduate trainees largely learn the knowledge, skills and behaviours required for effective clinical reasoning implicitly, through experience and apprenticeship. There is a growing consensus that schools should teach clinical reasoning in a way that is explicitly integrated into courses throughout each year, adopting a systematic approach consistent with current evidence. However, the clinical reasoning literature is ‘fragmented’ and can be difficult for medical educators to access. The purpose of this symposium is to provide evidence-based practical recommendations for curriculum leads and educators.

https://doi.org/10.1080/0142159X.2020.1842343

Session hosted by:
UK Clinical Reasoning in Medical Education Group (CReME) 

Session theme:
Teaching and facilitating learning

Target audience group:
Policy Makers
Curriculum leads and educators

Target care sector:
Undergraduate education